New learning channel on digital health and innovation


Digital technologies have proven potential to enhance health outcomes by improving medical diagnosis, data-based treatment decisions, digital therapeutics, clinical trials, self-management of care and person-centred care, as well as creating more evidence-based knowledge, skills and competence for professionals to support health care.

OpenWHO's new Digital Health and Innovation channel provides advice on how to expand the use of digital technologies and maximize the opportunities of the digital transformation of health care to enable sustainable health systems and universal health coverage, while avoiding pitfalls and managing risks.

The channel currently hosts one course on ethics and governance of artificial intelligence (AI) for health and will continue to expand its offerings in the coming months.

Adapted from the core contents of the Guidance on Ethics & Governance of Artificial Intelligence for Health, the course introduces entry-level knowledge to policymakers, AI developers and designers, and health care providers who are involved in designing, developing, using and regulating AI technology for health.

AI has enormous potential for improving health outcomes and helping countries achieve universal health coverage. However, for AI to have a beneficial impact on people’s health, ethical considerations and human rights must be placed at the centre of its design, development and use.

The course will take approximately 3.5 hours to complete, and offers both Confirmation of Participation and Record of Achievement certificates. Participants who receive a Record of Achievement can also download a digital badge for the course.

OpenWHO featured on Thought Leaders podcast


As OpenWHO celebrated 5 years of operations, the learning platform's role in providing trusted information during emergency response was highlighted on the openSAP Invites Thought Leaders podcast.

The episode featured Heini Utunen, who serves as Acting Head of the Learning and Capacity Development Unit in the WHO Health Emergencies Programme and manages the OpenWHO platform. You can listen to the podcast here.

"Our contribution to the learning in public health is that of equity," Utunen said. "We believe that it's the cornerstone for any action that we take with learning materials and learning interventions to enable as many people as possible to access and utilize the materials and make it as easy as possible for the learner to join the learning journey."

The European Union for Azerbaijan spotlights health workers learning on OpenWHO


The European Union for Azerbaijan highlighted the growing popularity of the OpenWHO learning platform among Azerbaijani health workers in a recent news story.

The story reported a tenfold increase in participation over the last 6 months to 18 000 enrolments. It also included feedback from health workers who have utilized the learning platform, including Dr Ziyafat Guliyeva who completed 81 OpenWHO courses.

“OpenWHO provides lots of opportunities. I found it very useful that learning methods on disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment include not only written materials, but video clips with details, as well. I got acquainted with the new methodology on taking medications along with the modern diagnostics techniques”, says Dr Guliyeva.

Read the full story from the European Union for Azerbaijan here.

OpenWHO's Azerbaijan learning channel, which includes a course in Azerbaijani and links to additional courses in Russian and Turkish, is available here.

Building health systems resilience during and beyond the pandemic


On 19 October 2021, WHO launched its position paper Building health systems resilience for universal health coverage and health security during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond to support countries in recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic. This reinforces the need for an integrated approach to building health systems resilience in the context of unprecedented public and political calls for greater resilience in health systems to tackle diverse and complex public health challenges – from acute to chronic shocks – those countries are facing in the 21st century.

To help address this, OpenWHO has launched a free course that introduces health systems resilience attributes and key requirements for enabling system resilience with an integrated approach across policymaking, planning, operational levels and in monitoring and evaluation efforts. The target audiences are policy makers, managers and other current and aspiring leaders in health, particularly those responsible for public health management at national, subnational and service delivery levels.

By the end of this course, participants will develop the knowledge and skills to apply an integrated approach to making health systems resilient to public health challenges. Participants will be awarded a Certificate of Participation by completing at least 80% of the course material, and a Certificate of Achievement by earning at least 80% of the maximum number of points from all graded assignments.

Join the course here: *An integrated approach to building health systems resilience*

Join one of our 33 Russian courses on Russian Language Day


Each year on 6 June, we celebrate the Russian language – one of the 6 official languages of the United Nations – on Russian Language Day.

OpenWHO currently hosts 33 courses in Russian, with additional courses in translation.

Celebrate Russian Language Day by enrolling in one of our free Russian courses today!

Check out OpenWHO's 5-year scrapbook and join our anniversary webinar


We are celebrating 5 years of our open learning platform! You can view our OpenWHO scrapbook and other 5th anniversary materials here.

As a reminder, please join us for a webinar on Wednesday, 1 June 2022 celebrating this exciting milestone. The free event will be held from 11:30 – 13:30 CEST and is open to anyone interested. Register for the webinar here.

WHO launched OpenWHO in June 2017 to facilitate the transfer of public health knowledge for emergencies on a massive scale in anticipation of the next pandemic. Grounded in the principles of open access and equity, courses are free, self-paced, accessible in low-bandwidth and offline formats, and available in national and local languages.

After serving responders in outbreaks from Ebola to plague, OpenWHO dramatically scaled up course production for the COVID-19 pandemic, making life-saving information from WHO experts available online at a time when lockdowns and social distancing limited our ability to physically come together to learn.

The 1 June webinar will be divided into 2 parts:

  1. Behind the scenes with OpenWHO (11:30 – 12:30 CEST)
    This session will explore OpenWHO’s journey from June 2017 to today with WHO leaders who shaped the open learning platform and paved the way for its pandemic response.

  2. Disseminating learning for vulnerable contexts (12:30 – 13:30 CEST)
    This session will feature partners’ experiences disseminating public health emergency learning and the impact it has made on vulnerable contexts.

We look forward to seeing you on 1 June to celebrate 5 years of OpenWHO!

Invitation au webinaire et nouveaux cours et langues sur OpenWHO


Cours sur la variole du singe disponibles en anglais et en français

À la suite des récentes flambées épidémiques de la variole du singe, apprenez-en davantage et préparez-vous à réagir grâce aux cours OpenWHO sur la variole du singe. Un cours d'introduction sur la maladie, les voies de transmission, les symptômes cliniques et les stratégies de prévention et de contrôle pour le personnel de santé est disponible, ainsi qu'un cours intermédiaire plus approfondi conçu pour les agents de santé publique et le personnel de santé. Les cours sont disponibles en anglais et en français.

  • Variole du singe : Cours d'introduction aux contextes d'épidémies en Afrique: anglais | français
  • Variole du singe : Épidémiologie, préparation et réponse aux contextes d'épidémies en Afrique : anglais | français

Veuillez noter que le contenu et la portée de ces cours sur la variole du singe ont été adaptés aux épidémies dans les pays africains où la maladie est endémique. Les supports de cours ont été mis à jour en 2021 (cours intermédiaire) et en 2020 (cours d'introduction).

Vous êtes invités : Webinaire célébrant les 5 ans d'OpenWHO

Le 1er juin 2022, rejoignez-nous pour un webinaire célébrant les 5 ans de la plateforme d'apprentissage libre d’accès de l'OMS pour les urgences sanitaires, OpenWHO.org. L'événement gratuit aura lieu de 11h30 à 13h30 CEST et est ouvert à toute personne intéressée.

Le webinaire sera divisé en 2 parties :

  1. Les coulisses de l'OpenWHO (11:30 - 12:30 CEST): Cette session explorera le parcours d'OpenWHO de juin 2017 à aujourd'hui avec les meneurs de l'OMS qui ont façonné la plateforme d'apprentissage libre d’accès et traçé la voie à sa riposte face à la pandémie.

  2. Diffusion de l'apprentissage pour les contextes vulnérables (12:30 - 13:30 CEST): Cette session présentera les expériences des partenaires en matière de diffusion de l'apprentissage en situation d'urgence de santé publique et l'impact qu'elle a eu sur les contextes vulnérables.

Inscrivez-vous au webinaire ici.

Nouveaux cours et langues

Nous sommes heureux d’annoncer les cours suivants sur la COVID-19 :

Nouveaux cours sur d'autres thèmes de santé :

Nouvelles traductions

Les 12 traductions suivantes ont été lancées ce mois-ci :

  • La santé mentale et le soutien psychosocial (SMSPS) en cas d'urgence en polonais et ukrainien.
  • La rage en français et russe.
  • Coût de l'introduction et du déploiement du vaccin COVID-19 en macédonien.
  • Prévention et contrôle des infections en macédonien.
  • Procédures opérationnelles standard pour les urgences en arabe.
  • Gestion des déchets en macédonien.
  • Nettoyage de l'environnement en macédonien.
  • Bon usage des antibiotiques: une approche par compétences macédonien.
  • Encourager le secteur privé à fournir les outils contre la COVID-19 et à atteindre l’objectif de Santé pour tous en français et russe.

Mise à jour du contenu des cours

Les supports de cours suivants ont été révisés pour tenir compte des mises à jour apportées au contenu technique:

Nous avons le plaisir d'annoncer qu'OpenWHO dispose désormais de 46 cours sur le COVID-19, avec un total de 155 cours répartis dans 64 langues. Tous les cours pour COVID-19 sont accessibles ici. Vous pouvez utiliser la barre d'outils pour filtrer les cours par langue. Vous pouvez également accéder à nos catalogues qui présentent tous les cours et toutes les langues disponibles pour COVID-19 et d'autres sujets de santé ici.

NoExcuse #StopSEAH Série de webinaires sur OpenWHO

L'OMS s'est engagée à donner à son personnel, ses partenaires et ses collaborateurs les moyens de prévenir et de protéger toute allégation d'exploitation, d'abus et de harcèlement sexuels (SEAH) et d'y répondre efficacement et rapidement. Une nouvelle session a été récemment ajoutée à OpenWHO sur la masculinité positive afin d'amorcer un changement culturel pour la prévention et la réponse à l'exploitation, aux abus et au harcèlement sexuels.

Bulletin d'information mensuel

Vous pouvez accéder au bulletin d'information le plus récent ici. Les points forts du bulletin sont également disponibles en chinois, français, portugais, russe et espagnol.

Cordialement,

L'équipe d'OpenWHO

Monkeypox courses available in English and French


Human monkeypox is a rare emerging zoonotic disease of concern since it was first identified in humans in the seventies. It is one of the first epidemic-prone disease learning resources made available on the OpenWHO platform, in 2018.

Working collaboratively with WHO expert teams, the introductory course was launched and updated on OpenWHO to provide a general overview of the disease, describing its emergence, routes of transmission, symptomatology, and prevention and control strategies for health care personnel in charge of disease prevention and control and for the general public.

A more in-depth intermediate course is also available, designed for public health officials and health workers, for an advanced understanding of its epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment, as well as effective strategies for prevention, investigation and response to outbreaks.

  • Monkeypox: Introductory course for African outbreak contexts: English | Français
  • Monkeypox: Epidemiology, preparedness and response for African outbreak contexts: English | Français

Please note that the content and scope of these courses on monkeypox have been tailored for outbreaks in African countries where the disease is endemic. The course materials were last updated in 2021 (intermediate course) and 2020 (introductory course).

You're invited: Webinar celebrating 5 years of OpenWHO


On 1 June 2022, please join us for a webinar celebrating 5 years of WHO’s open learning platform for health emergencies, OpenWHO.org. The free event will be held from 11:30 – 13:30 CEST and is open to anyone interested.

Register for the webinar here.

WHO launched OpenWHO in June 2017 to facilitate the transfer of public health knowledge for emergencies on a massive scale in anticipation of the next pandemic. Grounded in the principles of open access and equity, courses are free, self-paced, accessible in low-bandwidth and offline formats, and available in national and local languages.

After serving responders in outbreaks from Ebola to plague, OpenWHO dramatically scaled up course production for the COVID-19 pandemic, making life-saving information from WHO experts available online at a time when lockdowns and social distancing limited our ability to physically come together to learn.

The 1 June webinar will be divided into 2 parts:

  1. Behind the scenes with OpenWHO (11:30 – 12:30 CEST)
    This session will explore OpenWHO’s journey from June 2017 to today with WHO leaders who shaped the open learning platform and paved the way for its pandemic response.

  2. Disseminating learning for vulnerable contexts (12:30 – 13:30 CEST)
    This session will feature partners’ experiences disseminating public health emergency learning and the impact it has made on vulnerable contexts.

We look forward to seeing you on 1 June to celebrate 5 years of OpenWHO!

New WHO online course on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in emergencies


As we mark Mental Health Awareness Month, we are pleased to offer a new WHO online course in English, Ukrainian and Polish that introduces participants to Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in emergencies.

This free course presents how to apply existing practical, evidence-based, scalable tools and practice-led approaches for the successful implementation of projects to strengthen Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) in emergencies – all based on WHO, Inter-Agency Standing Committee and Sphere Handbook content. The online orientation is designed to strengthen the competencies of health sector actors working in emergencies to establish, support and scale-up MHPSS in countries.

The primary audience of this course is humanitarian health sector staff seeking to integrate MHPSS into their programmes. This includes WHO Health Emergencies Programme staff and humanitarian actors from United Nations agencies, NGOs and governments. In addition, professional officers working in areas such as noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), reproductive health and HIV in country offices, humanitarian organizations and Ministries of Health will benefit from participating in at least some of the course modules.

The 7-hour course can be taken wherever, whenever you want on OpenWHO.org, all at once or in several sittings. You have the opportunity to earn a certificate for test-based achievement, as well as a digital badge to share your achievement with your networks. The course will be available later in additional languages.

You can access the MHPSS training here.

Visit our virtual booth at the Global South-South Development Expo


Help us spread the word: OpenWHO is hosting a virtual booth as part of the Global South-South Development (GSSD) Expo 2022!

Co-hosted by the Government of Thailand and the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), the theme of this year's expo is “Advancing South-South and Triangular Cooperation for Sustainable COVID-19 Recovery: Towards a Smart and Resilient Future”. The annual event is organized by the United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation (UNOSSC) to showcase evidence-based development solutions in collaboration with United Nations agencies and other partners.

Our virtual booth – which is now live – showcases OpenWHO.org and how we leave no one behind by promoting health literacy and equity through the massive online delivery of life-saving health knowledge. If you visit from 9-13 May, you will have the opportunity to chat with OpenWHO team members according to the posted schedule.

To access our virtual booth, live chat and the entire virtual exhibition, please follow the steps below:

  • Step 1: Go to the main GSSD Expo 2022 website.

  • Step 2: Register using the "General Visitors Registration" button or the direct link here.

  • Step 3: Once you have registered, click “Login” to enter the platform.

  • Step 4: Once inside the platform, you will see the main lobby of the virtual GSSD Expo. Click "Exhibition" in the lobby or the "Exhibit Hall 1" tab in the upper menu, and OpenWHO’s booth will be the first to appear.

Hope to see you and your colleagues there!

Celebrating World Portuguese Language Day


The Portuguese language is the most widely spoken language in the southern hemisphere, with 265 million speakers worldwide according to UNESCO. Given its geographical reach and high use in vulnerable communities, the OpenWHO platform offers 28 courses in Portuguese.

Join us in celebrating Portuguese Language Day on 5 May by enrolling in one of our free multilingual courses for managing public health emergencies. Open to all, anytime, from anywhere.

Have you earned your Ready4Response certificate? Now with Continuing Professional Development certification


Certificates for the Ready4Response course series now highlight the courses' Continuing Professional Development (CPD) accreditation and include a QR code verifying that learners successfully passed each course.

The two Ready4Response courses – Tier 1 and Tier 2 – received CPD accreditation in January, certifying that their content and structure have been independently assessed and approved for continuing personal and professional development purposes. They were the first OpenWHO courses to receive this recognition, which is now noted on the course certificates.

A QR code on each certificate also enables employers and other interested parties to verify that an individual successfully completed and passed all course exercises with the click of a button.

As WHO’s core curriculum for health emergency response, the Ready4Response course series was created to train health workers and responders currently working, or interested in working, in national health emergency response. With a multi-tiered core curriculum, the series aims to develop consistent learning standards across the emergency response workforces at national level, equipping participants with the essential competencies needed to work in public health emergency response.

Protecting workers’ health and safety: Online training resources at your fingertips


Everyone deserves to work in a place that is healthy and safe. Each year on 28 April, we celebrate World Day for Safety and Health at Work to raise awareness of this right and the steps we can take to ensure it is a reality for workers across the globe.

Training is key. Nearly half of the world’s population works. Providing workers with the latest occupational health and safety knowledge can help protect them from work-related injuries, diseases and deaths. This is especially important during public health emergencies like the COVID-19 pandemic.

Workplaces have played an important role in both the spread and mitigation of COVID-19. Health workers of all kinds have been particularly affected by the pandemic. Not only have they been sick, they have suffered adverse effects of prolonged use of personal protective equipment, fatigue and mental health problems, violence and harassment and exposure to hazardous disinfectants.

The pandemic has stimulated many work settings around the world to expand telework and hybrid work arrangements. All these can impact the health, safety and wellbeing of workers.

So the World Health Organization (WHO) is offering free online courses on these topics on its OpenWHO.org learning platform. Materials are available in multilingual and low-bandwidth formats to maximize access.

WHO has also collaborated with partners like the International Labour Organization (ILO) on additional training materials to protect health workers and responders and prepare workplaces for future health emergencies. To access these learning resources, please visit the links below.

  • COVID-19 and work: Staying healthy and safe at work during the COVID-19 pandemic (OpenWHO): This course is intended to guide workers and their representatives, business leaders, managers, as well as occupational health and safety professionals in protecting their workplace during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Healthy and safe telework (OpenWHO): This course provides guidance to teleworkers and their managers on protecting and promoting health and wellbeing while teleworking.

  • Occupational health and safety for health workers in the context of COVID-19 (OpenWHO): All health workers require knowledge and skills to protect themselves and others from the occupational risks they encounter, so that they can work safely and effectively. This course consists of five sections in response to these needs.

  • All-Hazard Rapid Response Teams Training Package (WHO Health Security Learning Platform): The all-hazard Rapid Response Teams Training Package is a structured comprehensive collection of training resources and tools enabling relevant training institutions to organize, run and evaluate face-to-face training for Rapid Response Teams tailored to country specific needs.

  • Occupational safety and health in public health emergencies: a manual for protecting health workers and responders (WHO/ILO publication): This manual provides an overview of the main occupational safety and health risks faced by emergency responders during disease outbreaks and other emergencies, such as natural disasters, chemical incidents, radiological emergencies and emergencies involving conflicts. The intent is to assist organizations and workplaces to better prepare and respond to these events.

  • HealthWISE - Work Improvement in Health Services (ILO/WHO publication): HealthWISE is a practical, participatory quality improvement tool for health facilities. The HealthWISE package consists of an Action Manual and a Trainers' Guide to combine action and learning. Topics include occupational safety and health, personnel management and environmental health.

Open to all, anytime, anywhere: Free online courses bring vaccine knowledge to the global community


Empowering health workers, decision-makers and the public with trusted knowledge about immunization is critical to protecting people from vaccine-preventable diseases. Health professionals need this knowledge to safely and effectively administer vaccines, leaders rely on it to inform health policy, and individuals depend on it to make decisions about their own health and the health of their families.

That is why the World Health Organization has developed a suite of online courses addressing key vaccination topics on its free learning platform OpenWHO.org. Courses are available in national and local languages and can be taken at each learner’s own pace, all at once or across several sittings, to enable access for as many people as possible.

As we celebrate World Immunization Week from 24-30 April, we welcome you to enroll in the following OpenWHO courses and share them with your networks. Vaccines save lives — and so can knowledge.

COVID-19 vaccine courses

  • COVID-19 vaccination training for health workers: All health workers involved in implementation of COVID-19 vaccination need to have adequate knowledge and skills in order to ensure safe and efficient COVID-19 vaccine administration. The COVID-19 vaccination training for health workers package is developed for frontline health workers in countries. The package, developed in collaboration with UNICEF, consists of 6 modules, which include video lectures, quizzes, job aids, interactive exercises and downloadable presentations with the available information.

  • Orientation to national deployment and vaccination planning for COVID-19 vaccines: The Access to COVID-19 Tools (ACT) Accelerator’s Country Readiness and Delivery workstream has released guidance on developing a national deployment and vaccination plan (NDVP) for COVID-19 vaccines. This course is intended to help national and sub-national focal points in countries develop the NDVP and prepare for COVID-19 vaccine introduction.

  • COVID-19 vaccine-specific resources: Health workers involved in deployment and implementation of COVID-19 vaccination require vaccine-specific knowledge to ensure safe and efficient vaccine delivery. This training provides key information about COVID-19 vaccines through short instructional videos, vaccine explainers, job aids, topic briefings and downloadable presentations.

  • Learning how to use the COVID-19 Vaccine Introduction and deployment Costing (CVIC) tool: The CVIC tool is the WHO-UNICEF tool designed to assist countries in the process of planning and costing COVID-19 vaccination. The aim of this course is to demonstrate the use of the CVIC tool. The course is targeting national programme managers and personnel who have been involved in the costing, budgeting or financing processes of COVID-19 vaccine delivery in a country.

  • Discover your leadership moment: The pandemic has revealed deep structural and systemic issues in our society. From equity issues to people's loss of trust in institutions evidenced by vaccine hesitancy, the need for a different approach to leading consequential change is evident. How do we mobilize people to tackle complexity, while holding them through uncertainty towards a better future? This course aims to start you on your leadership journey to do just that!

Additional immunization topics

  • Vaccine safety basics: This course introduces participants to the foundations of vaccine pharmacovigilance. The aim of this course is to provide healthcare professionals whose work involve vaccine safety issues, with essential knowledge about vaccines and their safety aspects. These professionals can include nurses, midwives, community health workers, as well as pharmacists, medical doctors and immunization programme or vaccine safety communication officers.

  • Inequality monitoring in immunization: Ensuring universal access to immunization promotes better population health and improved outcomes across diverse aspects of development. Unfortunately, however, the benefits of vaccines are spread unevenly. Monitoring inequality in vaccination coverage is a way to identify where inequalities exist and where disadvantaged subgroups stand in terms of access to and utilization of health services. This course introduces the general steps of inequality monitoring in immunization, which should be an integral part of a country’s immunization programme.

  • Influenza prevention and control: This course focuses on tools that can be used to prevent and control influenza. These tools include: seasonal influenza vaccines, diagnostics and therapeutics.

  • Recognizing and managing anaphylaxis: Anaphylaxis is a severe, immediate allergic reaction. Symptoms that can be life-threatening can occur within seconds to minutes, rarely hours, after contact with the allergenic substance including medicines and vaccines. This course provides practical guidance to frontline health care providers and also vaccinators with key information on its identification, differentiating it from other clinical conditions such as fainting and other stress-related responses. It also provides step-by-step guidance on the case management at the site of the event and the process of referral.

  • Flutool Plus - using the WHO Seasonal Influenza Immunisation Costing Tool: Flutool Plus is the WHO tool designed to help lower- and middle-income countries in the process of costing of seasonal influenza immunisation programmes. The aim of this course is to promote the dissemination and use of Flutool Plus. The course is meant for national programme managers, who are responsible for mobilizing resources to set up sustainable immunisation programmes for seasonal influenza.

  • Pandemic influenza vaccines: National deployment and vaccination plans: National deployment and vaccination plans for pandemic influenza vaccines are national tools which ensure that during a pandemic, processes and structures are functional so that vaccines are rapidly deployed and administered to target populations. The existence of a national deployment and vaccination plans for pandemic influenza vaccines is also a pre-requisite in the request process to access vaccines from WHO secured stockpiles. The learning package consists of 10 modules, which include video lectures and downloadable presentations that have been updated with the latest information and developments to help countries develop or revise their national deployment and vaccination plans.

Click here to access OpenWHO courses in additional languages, as well as courses addressing related public health topics, including introductory courses on 28 diseases.

Celebrating the English and Spanish languages


English and Spanish are the most popular languages for online learning on the OpenWHO platform, with 74% of enrolments in English language courses and 14% in Spanish language courses.

Join us in celebrating English Language Day and Spanish Language Day on 23 April by enrolling in one of our free multilingual courses for managing public health emergencies. Open to all, anytime, from anywhere.

联合国中文日 - Chinese Language Day


20 April is Chinese Language Day! OpenWHO.org hosts 13 free online courses in Chinese on key public health topics, including COVID-19 vaccination, hand hygiene, risk communication and more. These Chinese language courses have more than 112 000 enrolments and continue to grow.

Starting learning in Chinese on OpenWHO today!

World Health Day 2022: Our planet, our health


Each year on 7 April we celebrate World Health Day, marking the anniversary of the founding of WHO in 1948.

In the midst of a pandemic, a polluted planet, and increasing diseases like cancer, asthma and heart disease, WHO is focusing global attention this World Health Day 2022 on urgent actions needed to keep humans and the planet healthy and foster a movement to create societies focused on well-being.

Celebrate World Health Day by joining one of OpenWHO's 148 free online courses on key public health topics, including the COVID-19 pandemic and additional topics to contribute to a #HealthierTomorrow, from medical waste management to tobacco product regulation.

Nouveaux cours et nouvelles langues sur OpenWHO ce mois-ci


Nouveaux cours et nouvelles langues

Nouveaux cours lancés en mars

Nous avons le plaisir de vous annoncer que les cours suivants ont été récemment mis à disposition :

  • Equipement respiratoire dans le cadre de la COVID-19 : Ce cours enseigne comment choisir le bon équipement pour votre établissement, comment installer un nouvel équipement respiratoire, comment utiliser cliniquement l'équipement respiratoire, comment entretenir l'équipement, y compris le dépannage, les réparations et la prévention et le contrôle des infections, et comment mettre l'équipement hors service.
  • Notions de base sur la sécurité des vaccins : L'objectif de ce cours est de fournir aux professionnels de santé dont le travail implique des questions de sécurité des vaccins, les connaissances essentielles sur les vaccins et leurs aspects de sécurité.
  • Formation sur les épidémies de rougeole : Ce cours apporte les compétences essentielles de préparation, de détection, d'investigation, de réponse et de rétablissement nécessaires pour contenir une épidémie de rougeole.
  • Sécurité dans l'administration de médicaments pour les maladies tropicales négligées : Ce cours offre des outils pratiques, des modules de formation et des aide-mémoires pour améliorer la planification, la préparation et le suivi de l'administration en toute sécurité des médicaments contre les maladies tropicales négligées.
  • Infections du site opératoire : Ce cours aborde la problématique mondiale des infections du site opératoire (ISO), les facteurs de risque et les mesures de prévention que vous pouvez prendre pour réduire les ISO.

Rejoignez OpenWHO dans la lutte contre la tuberculose !

Bien que la tuberculose soit une maladie évitable et curable, elle reste l'une des maladies infectieuses les plus meurtrières au monde. Chaque jour, plus de 4 100 personnes perdent la vie à cause de la tuberculose, et près de 28 000 personnes tombent malades. Des progrès ont été réalisés au niveau mondial. Toutefois, la pandémie de COVID-19 a mis en péril ces avancées.

Apprenez-en davantage sur la façon de lutter contre la tuberculose grâce aux cours disponibles sur notre chaîne End TB : 1) Traitement préventif de la tuberculose ; 2) Diagnostic rapide pour la détection de la tuberculose ; et 3) Traitement de la tuberculose résistante aux médicaments.

Les 17 traductions suivantes ont été lancées ce mois-ci :

  • Gestion des exercices de simulation en ukrainien
  • Établissements de soins de longue durée en ukrainien
  • Centre des opérations d'urgence de santé publique en ukrainien
  • Ressources spécifiques au vaccin contre la COVID-19 en ukrainien
  • Participation du secteur privé en arabe, espagnol, et farsi
  • Gestion clinique : Considérations générales en russe
  • Gestion clinique : Maladie légère, modérée et sévère en kazakh
  • Formation à la vaccination contre la COVID-19 pour le personnel de santé en sgaw karen et shan
  • Sécurité des injections en macédonien
  • Microbiologie de base en macédonien
  • Composantes essentielles de la prévention et du contrôle des infections (IPC) en macédonien
  • Test de diagnostic rapide de l'antigène du SARS-CoV-2 en russe.
  • Décontamination en macédonien
  • Santé bucco-dentaire en macédonien.

Mises à jour du contenu des cours:

Les supports de cours suivants ont été révisés pour refléter les actualisations du contenu technique et sont désormais à jour :

Nous avons le plaisir d'annoncer qu'OpenWHO dispose désormais de 44 cours sur COVID-19 et de 100 cours sur d'autres sujets clés de la santé, répartis en 64 langues. Tous les cours sur la COVID-19 sont accessibles ici. Vous pouvez utiliser la barre d'outils pour filtrer les cours par langue. Vous pouvez également accéder à nos catalogues qui présentent tous les cours et toutes les langues disponibles sur la COVID-19 et d'autres thèmes de santé ici.

Série de webinaires "NoExcuse #StopSEAH" sur OpenWHO

L'OMS s'est engagée à donner les moyens à son personnel, ses partenaires et ses collaborateurs de prévenir, protéger et répondre efficacement et rapidement à toute allégation d'exploitation, d'abus et de harcèlement sexuels (EAHS).

Visitez notre page dédiée sur OpenWHO ici qui sera régulièrement mise à jour avec des ressources vidéo traitant de ce sujet. Dans la dernière vidéo qui a été ajoutée à la bibliothèque, vous entendrez des experts parler des progrès et des défis auxquels les agences humanitaires et d'intervention d'urgence sont confrontées dans la lutte contre l'EAHS.

Newsletter mensuelle

Vous pouvez accéder à la dernière newsletter ici. Les points forts de la newsletter sont également disponibles en chinois, français, portugais, russe et espagnol.

Cordialement,

L'équipe d'OpenWHO

Marking World TB Day with online learning to End TB


Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the world’s top infectious killers. Urgent and intensified action is required by countries, partners and civil society to ramp up the TB response to save the lives of millions affected by TB each year.

The End TB Channel brings together courses designed to build strategic and operational knowledge. It provides critical training on essential skills to facilitate the implementation of WHO’s End TB Strategy based on sound ethics principles and due protection of human rights. Through this interactive platform, you will learn about the latest WHO TB guidelines on TB diagnosis, prevention, treatment and care, and what practical steps can be taken to ensure equitable access to quality and timely care for those most in need.

The channel currently hosts courses on tuberculosis preventive treatment, rapid diagnostics for tuberculosis detection and drug-resistant tuberculosis treatment. As new WHO guidelines and operational guidance become available, new resources will be added and existing courses updated to enhance learning.

Célébrons la Journée de la langue française avec 56 cours de français


C'est la Journée de la langue française. Le français est la langue officielle de 29 pays, et OpenWHO propose 56 cours en français. Plus de francophones ont ainsi accès aux informations vitales pour améliorer la réponse aux urgences sanitaires. Inscrivez-vous à un cours en ligne gratuit en français dès aujourd'hui !

OpenWHO celebrates International Women's Day


During the pandemic, the proportion of women learning on OpenWHO has grown from 40% to 52%. More women have now free access to life-saving knowledge! Share WHO's tweet to help spread the word.

On International Women's Day 2022, join us in celebrating women in health care & education around the globe!

New course on engaging the private sector to deliver COVID-19 tools and achieve Health for All


During health emergencies, governments need to mobilize all resources – both public and private – to accelerate the implementation of national response efforts. At the same time, they are called to ensure the private health sector’s actions are aligned to core principles of Universal Health Coverage (UHC) and are directed towards the achievement of national health goals.

A new OpenWHO course defines key concepts and presents a range of tools and proven approaches to enable Ministries of Health to harness private sector capacity to achieve key policy goals, ensuring equitable access to COVID-19 tools while advancing Health for All.

The course has been designed to support countries’ response to COVID-19 and will be equally relevant with regards to the engagement of the private sector for all the health objectives needed to ensure the achievement of Health for All.

The target audience includes Ministries of Health, policymakers and programme managers, WHO staff at regional and country levels, and global health practitioners and researchers supporting COVID-19 efforts in countries.

Nouveaux cours et nouvelles langues sur OpenWHO ce mois-ci


Nouveaux cours et nouvelles langues

Nouveaux cours lancés

Nous avons le plaisir d'annoncer les cours suivants sur la COVID-19:

Nouveaux cours sur d'autres thèmes de santé

Nouvelles traductions

Les 7 traductions suivantes ont été lancées ce mois-ci :

  • Gestion et facilitation d'une revue après action (RAA) en ukrainien.
  • Nettoyage et désinfection de l'environnement en arménien.
  • Formation à la vaccination contre la COVID-19 pour les agents de santé en birman.
  • Gestion et facilitation d'une revue intra-action (RIA) nationale sur la COVID-19 en ukrainien.
  • Introduction à la prévention et au contrôle des infections (IPC) en macédonien.
  • Ready for Response niveau 1 en lao.
  • Ready for Response niveau 2 en lao.

Mise à jour du contenu des cours

Les supports des cours suivants ont été révisés pour refléter les mises à jour du contenu technique et sont désormais actualisés :

Nous avons le plaisir d'annoncer que OpenWHO propose désormais 42 cours sur la COVID-19 et 84 cours sur d'autres sujets clés de la santé, répartis en 62 langues. Tous les cours sur la COVID-19 sont accessibles ici. Vous pouvez utiliser la barre d'outils pour filtrer les cours par langue. Vous pouvez également accéder à nos catalogues qui présentent tous les cours et toutes les langues disponibles concernant la COVID-19 et d'autres thèmes de santé ici.

Maladies tropicales négligées : L'OMS lance un sondage pour élargir son offre de cours de formation en ligne

Afin d'élargir son offre de cours en ligne, le département de lutte contre les maladies tropicales négligées de l'OMS lance une enquête virtuelle pour évaluer les lacunes, les besoins et les préférences actuels en matière de formation en ligne pour le renforcement des capacités. Le questionnaire comprend 23 questions et est disponible dans les langues des Nations Unies et en portugais. Pour accéder à l'enquête, veuillez cliquer sur votre langue préférée : arabe, chinois, anglais, français, portugais, russe et espagnol.

Actuellement, la plateforme OpenWHO héberge une chaîne dédiée aux maladies tropicales négligées (MTN) avec des cours multilingues disponibles, avec plusieurs cours supplémentaires à venir, abordant des sujets spécifiques aux maladies ou des sujets transverses.

Les cours Ready4Response Niveaux 1 et 2 sont maintenant accrédités CPD !

OpenWHO s'engage continuellement à fournir des formations de haute qualité, à soutenir votre développement professionnel et à assurer la crédibilité et les normes élevées du secteur. Les cours Ready for Response Niveau 1 et Niveau 2 ont été formellement accrédités pour le développement professionnel continu (CPD).

Ready4Response est un programme de base en plusieurs volets qui vise à développer des normes d'apprentissage cohérentes pour l'ensemble du personnel d'intervention d'urgence au niveau national. Il permet aux participants d'acquérir les compétences essentielles pour travailler dans le domaine de l'intervention d'urgence en santé publique.

Newsletter mensuelle

Vous pouvez accéder à la dernière newsletter ici. Les points forts de la newsletter sont également disponibles en chinois, français, portugais, russe et espagnol.

Cordialement,

L'équipe OpenWHO

Ending the neglect of poverty-related diseases through open-access learning


As we celebrate World Neglected Tropical Diseases Day on 30 January, the World Health Organization is shining a light on these devastating yet overlooked diseases by expanding the free online learning opportunities available on OpenWHO.org.

OpenWHO is launching 5 new online courses on Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs), for a total of 12 NTD courses hosted on WHO’s open-access learning platform. All courses are available on the NTD learning channel, which was established during the COVID-19 pandemic to enable continued training activities in the face of serious disruptions to the implementation of NTD programmes and on-site courses.

NTDs affect more than 1 billion people, mainly in the world’s poorest regions, where water safety, sanitation and access to health care are substandard. Some are associated with disabilities, deformities and social exclusion, while others are fatal without timely treatment.

NTDs are often ignored or poorly known and therefore become devastating for affected individuals and their communities. They are almost absent from the global health agenda, enjoy little funding, and perpetuate a cycle of poor educational outcomes and limited professional opportunities.

The 5 new OpenWHO courses address leprosy, tropical dermatology, supply chain management of NTD health products, visceral leishmaniasis in East Africa and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis. They join existing courses on NTDs in the context of COVID-19, rabies and One Health, and 5 skin NTDs (mycetoma, podoconiosis, scabies, tungiasis and yaws), which together have 25 000 course enrolments.

The NTD courses are most popular among students, which make up more than one-third of total enrolments, as well as health care professionals (28%) and national ministries (8%). The vast majority of learners are younger than age 40 (84%), with the largest proportion of learners falling in the 20-29 age bracket (45%).

Additional courses are being developed to further expand the offering of online training resources dedicated to NTDs and support implementation of Ending the neglect to attain the Sustainable Development Goals: a road map for neglected tropical diseases 2021−2030. The road map sets global targets and milestones to prevent, control, eliminate or eradicate 20 diseases and disease groups, as well as overarching and cross-cutting targets aligned with the Sustainable Development Goals.

To shape the production of future courses, WHO’s Department of Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases is launching a virtual survey to assess current gaps, needs and preferences in the offer of virtual tools for capacity strengthening. The survey includes 23 questions and is available in 7 languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

The NTD courses are also being translated for broader reach, with some courses already available in Arabic, French, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. Overall, OpenWHO hosts free online courses on 131 different topics, including 40 for COVID-19, with courses in 62 national and local languages and more than 6.2 million course enrolments.

You can learn more about NTDs and World NTD Day here.

Marking 2 years of pandemic learning response on OpenWHO.org


The 26th of January marks 2 years since WHO launched its first course on OpenWHO.org introducing learners across the globe to the then novel coronavirus. That course, which has been updated 13 times to reflect the latest evidence, is now available in 45 national and local languages and has surpassed 1 million enrolments.

Overall, the OpenWHO platform hosts 6.2 million enrolments across courses on 131 topics, including 40 courses for the COVID-19 response. To address the evolving learning needs, OpenWHO has focused on key thematic areas to shape its pandemic production strategy:

  • In 2020, the core focus was on providing information for mass audiences and health workers so they could protect themselves and others, including basic information about COVID-19 and infection prevention and control.
  • In 2021, OpenWHO prioritized learning support for the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines, providing essential information for health workers and national planning.
  • This year, OpenWHO will work to expand support to countries by providing localized learning based on WHO guidelines and developing additional channels for country-originated learning content.

At the centre of this work, OpenWHO continuously seeks to advance equity in the pandemic learning response.

“Everyone deserves access to knowledge to protect their health and the health of their loved ones,” said Dr Michael Ryan, Executive Director of the WHO Health Emergencies Programme. “Providing open-access online learning is an integral part of capacitating countries and communities to prepare for and respond effectively to health emergencies like the COVID-19 pandemic.”

OpenWHO celebrates International Day of Education


Today is International Day of Education! OpenWHO is advancing equity in education with free, self-paced, accessible, multilingual online courses on a variety of public health topics. Celebrate #EducationDay with OpenWHO by enrolling in a new course today.

OpenWHO Ready4Response courses receive Continuing Professional Development accreditation


The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is excited to announce that the OpenWHO Ready4Response course series has received “Continuing Professional Development” (CPD) accreditation, becoming the first courses on OpenWHO.org to receive this recognition.

CPD accreditation certifies that both the content and structure of Ready4Response Tier 1: Response context and principles and Tier 2: Systems, structures and skills have been independently assessed and approved for continuing personal and professional development purposes. The courses were developed by the Learning and Capacity Development Unit and are undergoing translation for additional reach.

As WHO’s core curriculum for health emergency response, the Ready4Response course series was created to train health workers and responders currently working, or interested in working, in national health emergency response. With a multi-tiered core curriculum, the series aims to develop consistent learning standards across the emergency response workforces at national level, equipping participants with the essential competencies needed to work in public health emergency response.

Achieving this accreditation continues OpenWHO’s goal of providing the highest quality of learning content for global learners and improving health emergency response in all contexts.

WHO will pursue course accreditation for future learning in the Ready4Response series, as well as across other key offerings.

Courses on 24 different diseases introduced on OpenWHO


27 December 2021 marks the 2nd International Day of Epidemic Preparedness. We, in OpenWHO and WHO, are helping the world prepare for epidemic events with free online learning on 24 different diseases, from Cholera to Zika. Everyone, everywhere deserves access to knowledge to protect themselves and their loved ones from epidemics and other health emergencies. Join us today!

OpenWHO.org: 2021 year in review


In its fifth year of operation, WHO’s OpenWHO.org learning platform has undergone significant development and expansion to meet the ongoing challenges of complex health emergencies globally. With increased engagement among learners during the COVID-19 pandemic, a series of major milestones were reached in 2021 highlighting the role OpenWHO plays in strengthening global health emergency response through online knowledge transfer.

By December 2021, OpenWHO had registered more than 6 million course enrolments and awarded more than 3 million certificates, the latter for course completion or surpassing the prescribed course assessment score. In total, learners have amassed more than 27 million video views across all platform content, comprising more than 693 000 hours of video streaming on connected devices. Along with a course completion rate well above the industry average for online learning, these milestones highlight the growing demand for relevant, high-quality learning resources in emergency contexts.

The scope of learning content across the platform has also grown to 120 total course topics, with 40 courses to support the COVID-19 response and 80 courses on other essential health topics, including an additional 23 diseases. Increased demand for reliable guidance during the COVID-19 pandemic is confirmed by measures of the most utilized learning content on the platform: Introduction to COVID-19 and COVID-19 personal protective equipment were the most visited and completed courses, respectively, and the animated COVID-19 explainer was the most popular video. Among the 18 OpenWHO learning channels, the COVID-19 channel was the most popular.

In demographic terms, students and health professionals, learners from India and those aged 20-29 are the most frequent visitors to OpenWHO. Among all learners, OpenWHO found that nearly half have enrolled in at least 2 courses and 71 000 superusers have completed at least 10 courses. Leveraging these repeat and superusers and to encourage learner activity more broadly, digital badges were introduced this year, with more than 60 000 badges already issued for course completers to share their learning achievements on social media.

To further increase learning uptake, OpenWHO now offers courses in 60 global languages, including the 15 most-spoken languages in the world as well as languages with high impact for affected populations, especially those in the least-developed countries. The Introduction to COVID-19 course was the most translated course and the French language was the most translated language. OpenWHO will expand these localization efforts going forward, with additional languages and translations underway to meet growing demand.

“For almost 2 years, we have worked together with amazing crowd power from all corners of the world and in particular from WHO country and regional offices to help ensure equitable access to pandemic and emergency-related WHO technical guidance in a large variety of languages. Evidence shows that accessing learning in preferred languages enhances uptake and comprehension and further can help save lives,” said Heini Utunen, acting Head of the Learning and Capacity Development Unit for the WHO Health Emergencies Programme.

Even with these expanded activities, the OpenWHO mandate to provide free, self-paced, accessible courses to improve health emergency response has remained unchanged. The platform continues to make life-saving knowledge available on a massive scale, not only to improve emergency response, having served frontline responders in outbreaks from Ebola to plague and now COVID-19, but also in anticipation of the next pandemic. It is with this aim that OpenWHO will continue to grow its learning portfolio in 2022 with a focus on serving countries with localized content, thereby strengthening health response globally and better serving affected populations now and in the future.

Nouveaux cours et nouvelles langues sur OpenWHO ce mois-ci


Nouveaux cours et langues

Nouveaux cours lancés

Nous avons le plaisir d'annoncer les cours suivants sur la COVID-19:

Nouveaux cours sur d'autres thèmes de santé :

Nouvelles traductions

60 langues sur OpenWHO

OpenWHO s'engage à traduire les cours dans autant de langues que possible, en particulier celles parlées par les communautés mal desservies et vulnérables, afin de rendre les connaissances essentielles accessibles à tous. Nous avons le plaisir de célébrer la 60ème langue sur notre plateforme, la langue tadjik.

Les 18 traductions suivantes ont été lancées ce mois-ci:

  • Introduction à la COVID-19 en grec.

  • IPC auprès des agents de santé en russe.

  • Centre des opérations d'urgence de santé publique en portugais, espagnol et lao.

  • Décontamination et stérilisation des dispositifs médicaux en russe.

  • Conseils sur l'utilisation des masques en shona.

  • Composants de base de l'IPC en russe.

  • Gestion clinique des patients atteints de COVID-19 : Investigations et soins pour les maladies légères, modérées et sévères en maithili.

  • Gestion des déchets en russe et néerlandais.

  • Nettoyage environnemental en néerlandais.

  • Hygiène de la main en kazakh.

  • COVID-19 et travail en japonais.

  • Santé et sécurité au travail en japonais.

  • Sécurité des injections en néerlandais.

  • Test de diagnostic rapide de l'antigène du SARS-CoV-2 en kazakh et tadjik

Nous avons le plaisir d'annoncer qu'OpenWHO dispose désormais de 40 cours sur la COVID-19, répartis en 60 langues. Tous les cours sur la COVID-19 sont accessibles ici. Vous pouvez utiliser la barre d'outils pour filtrer les cours par langue. Vous pouvez également accéder à nos catalogues qui présentent tous les cours et toutes les langues disponibles pour la COVID-19 et d'autres sujets de santé ici.

Partagez vos succès accomplis sur OpenWHO sur vos réseaux !

Nous introduisons de nouveaux badges numériques qui peuvent être facilement partagés sur vos reseaux sociaux. Si vous avez obtenu un certificat de réussite dans votre cours, votre badge numérique l'accompagne et se trouve sur votre page de certificats. Le badge comprendra un lien de vérification avec votre nom, la date d'émission et vos résultats. Si vous souhaitez en savoir plus sur les badges numériques de l'OpenWHO, veuillez cliquer ici.

Nouveau pays ajouté au portail “Soutien aux pays” sur OpenWHO

Ce portail propose des ressources pédagogiques pour soutenir la réponse d'un pays à la pandémie actuelle de COVID-19 et à d'autres menaces sanitaires. Créées en collaboration avec les bureaux de pays de l'OMS et les ministères de la Santé, les ressources fondées sur les orientations scientifiques de l'OMS sont disponibles dans la (les) langue(s) officielle(s) de chaque pays pour donner aux agents de santé de première ligne, aux décideurs et au public les moyens d'agir. La Thaïlande est l'ajout le plus récent à notre portail “Soutien aux pays”.

Newsletter mensuelle

Vous pouvez accéder à la newsletter la plus récente ici. Les principaux points de la newsletter sont également disponibles en chinois, français, portugais, russe et espagnol.

Alors que l'année 2021 touche à sa fin, l'équipe d'OpenWHO tient à exprimer ses sincères remerciements à chacun d'entre vous pour avoir appris et évolué avec nous. En cette nouvelle année, nous nous engageons à continuer à fournir un accès gratuit aux connaissances des experts pour améliorer la santé publique. Nous vous souhaitons à tous une nouvelle année en pleine santé et en toute sécurité.

Meilleurs vœux,

L'équipe d'OpenWHO

Marking World Antimicrobial Awareness Week with new OpenWHO course


WHO is developing an educational portfolio to help health staff take necessary actions to reduce the occurrence of Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR), which WHO has declared to be one of the top 10 global public health threats facing humanity.

The portfolio is based on adult learning principles that encourage learners to apply knowledge to improve health practices within their current job function.

Resources include a new OpenWHO course covering the principles and best practices of sexually transmitted infection (STI) treatment and optimal antimicrobial use and stewardship. The course is targeted to clinical providers, such as nurses, midwives, doctors and pharmacists, and was launched ahead of World Antimicrobial Awareness Week from 18-24 November.

Click here to watch a video to learn more about the AMR educational portfolio, which will continue to be rolled out in 2022. You can also learn more about AMR by participating in other courses featured on OpenWHO’s AMR learning channel or by visiting the WHO website.

Expanding capacity to tackle Neglected Tropical Diseases through online learning


Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) comprise 20 diseases or disease groups that affect more than 1 billion people, mainly living in poor, remote communities in the world’s tropical and sub-tropical areas. Some are associated with disabilities, deformities and social exclusion. Others are fatal without timely treatment. NTDs are often ignored or poorly known and therefore become devastating for affected individuals and their communities.

OpenWHO has played a critical role by enabling the continuation of training activities on NTDs as COVID-19 continues to seriously disrupt implementation of programmes and prevent on-site training courses on NTDs from being conducted. A major contribution to building capacity for public health control and management of NTDs has thus been the creation of a free-access learning channel on OpenWHO.org. The NTD channel was launched in March 2021 in collaboration with the Department of Control of NTDs at WHO headquarters.

The platform currently hosts 6 NTD-related courses in English; some courses are also available in Arabic, French, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish, with additional translation underway. The 6 courses cover a wide area of work, including NTDs in the context of COVID-19, rabies and One Health, and skin NTDs (mycetoma, podoconiosis, scabies and tungiasis). The pandemic has resulted in the need to adapt NTD activities and community-based interventions to ensure safe delivery; all of these components are covered in the OpenWHO course on NTDs in the context of COVID-19 to support countries in maintaining essential health services.

Thus far, the NTD courses have totaled over 20 000 enrolments. More than 10 additional courses are being developed to provide a wider offering of online training resources dedicated to NTDs.

OpenWHO user trends shift to serve new demographics during the pandemic


The COVID-19 pandemic has equalized the use of OpenWHO.org by gender. Prior to the pandemic, women represented 40% of platform learners, while men represented 60%; during the pandemic, the proportion of women participating in online learning on OpenWHO grew to 51%, slightly overtaking male learners (49%). The percentage of users identifying their gender as ‘other’ also increased from 0.08% to 0.15%. In courses on topics other than COVID-19, female learners provided fewer enrolments (43%).

Completion rates on OpenWHO have increased from 39% to a platform average of 54% during the pandemic. The platform has also expanded its reach to older and younger user groups. The age bracket of 70 years and older rose from 0% to 4.6% of learners, and users under 20 years have grown from 1.3% to 9.8%.

During the pandemic, enrolments from the WHO African Region have decreased from 23.1% to 8.6% of total enrolments, as interest in COVID-19 courses globally has outpaced courses addressing other, more regionalized outbreaks. Meanwhile, COVID-19 courses are both the most popular and have increased enrolments in the Southeast Asian (36%) and American (26%) regions.

When platform use is assessed based on countries’ classification by income level from the World Bank, additional shifts during the pandemic can be observed. Middle-income countries now dominate as the largest percentage of users (rising from 40.2% to 70.6% of total enrolments).

New course available: Influenza prevention and control


Influenza causes 3-5 million cases of severe illness and up to 650 000 respiratory deaths a year globally. Lower respiratory infections are the leading cause of death in low-income countries annually. Some populations are particularly vulnerable to seasonal influenza, either because they have a greater risk of exposure or because they have a greater risk of developing severe disease: pregnant women; health workers; people with chronic health conditions (such as diabetes, HIV, asthma, heart or lung disease); people over the age of 65 years; and children from 6 months to 59 months.

This course on Influenza prevention and control provides an overview of the tools to prevent and control influenza such as seasonal influenza vaccines, diagnostics and therapeutics. The training is intended for health workers and other stakeholders involved in preventing and treating influenza.

You can access more influenza-related courses through our Preparing for Pandemics channel, where you can learn more about the disease, surveillance, vaccination and risk communication.

Join us today and help protect the vulnerable this flu season!

Celebrating International Translation Day on 30 September: OpenWHO multilingual approach advances equity


In pursuit of equitable access, the OpenWHO team of the Learning and Capacity Development Unit has worked across the 3 levels of the Organization, and in particular together with WHO country and regional offices, to translate WHO’s evidence-based guidance into learning in the languages of Member States. Volunteer translators, public health institutes, Translators Without Borders and professional translation companies have been contributing to the translation work.

OpenWHO has translated COVID-19 online courses into as many languages as possible, nearing 60 languages on the platform, as WHO strives to ensure equitable access. Priority has been given to languages spoken by vulnerable or underserved populations in low- and middle-income countries as learning available in preferred languages enhances uptake and comprehension. These 56 languages available on OpenWHO include the official languages of every WHO region, the 15 most commonly spoken languages worldwide and the official languages of 43 out of 46 of the least-developed countries.

A total of 10.5 million words have been translated thus far and on average, each of OpenWHO’s COVID-19 courses has been translated into 4.8 languages. The 2 courses available in the most languages are the Introduction to COVID-19 course available in 44 languages and the Infection Prevention and Control course in 24 languages.

Multilingualism in OpenWHO's large-scale online production strategy has already resulted in 5.7 million course enrolments driven largely by 38 COVID-19 courses. The top 10 languages by enrolment are English (76.2%), Spanish (13.0%), French (3.1%), Arabic (1.5%), Portuguese (1.5%), Indian sign language (1.0%), Hindi (0.7%), Indonesian (0.6%), Russian (0.5%) and Italian (0.4%).

Nouveaux cours et nouvelles langues sur OpenWHO ce mois-ci


Newsletter mensuelle

Vous pouvez accéder à la newsletter la plus récente ici. Les points forts de la newsletter sont également disponibles en chinois, français, portugais, russe et espagnol.

Nouveaux cours et nouvelles langues pour la COVID-19

Nouveaux cours lancés

Nous avons le plaisir d'annoncer les cours suivants sur la COVID-19:

Nouveaux cours sur des sujets de santé:

Nouvelles traductions

Le 30 septembre est la Journée internationale de la traduction ! OpenWHO s'engage à traduire ses cours sur la COVID-19 dans le plus grand nombre de langues possible, en particulier celles parlées par les communautés mal desservies et vulnérables, afin de rendre les connaissances essentielles sur les pandémies accessibles à tous.

Les 7 traductions suivantes ont été lancées ce mois-ci :

  • Gestion clinique : Approche initiale en espagnol
  • Gestion clinique : Considérations générales en néerlandais
  • Gestion clinique : Investigations et soins pour les maladies légères, modérées et sévères en hindi et népalais
  • Gestion clinique : Réhabilitation des patients atteints de COVID-19 en français
  • Go.Data en ukrainien
  • Centre des opérations d'urgence en santé publique en russe

Nous sommes heureux d'annoncer qu'OpenWHO dispose désormais de 38 cours sur la COVID-19, répartis en 53 langues. Tous les cours sur la COVID-19 sont accessibles ici. Vous pouvez utiliser la barre d'outils pour filtrer les cours par langue. Vous pouvez également accéder à nos catalogues qui présentent tous les cours et toutes les langues disponibles pour les ressources sur la COVID-19 et d'autres sujets de santé ici.

Cours en ligne sur la stratégie de surveillance et de réponse intégrées aux maladies (IDSR) de l'OMS AFRO sur OpenWHO

L'objectif du kit de formation en ligne IDSR est de contribuer à la mise en œuvre de la stratégie régionale du Bureau régional africain de l'OMS pour la surveillance et la réponse intégrées aux maladies : 2020-2030 pour prévenir et répondre aux urgences sanitaires. La 3ème édition des directives techniques IDSR décrit explicitement ce qui doit être mis en place à chaque niveau du système de santé pour détecter et répondre aux maladies, conditions et événements de santé publique qui sont responsables de maladies évitables, de décès et d'invalidités dans les communautés locales.

Le kit de formation comprendra cinq cours en anglais, français et portugais. A ce jour, le cours 1 est disponible en anglais et en français et les 4 autres cours sont tous disponibles en anglais. Tous les cours devraient être lancés en français et en portugais d'ici fin 2021.

De nouveaux pays ajoutés à chaîne Soutien aux pays sur OpenWHO

Des pays supplémentaires ont été ajoutés au portail Soutien aux pays: Azerbaïdjan, Inde, Népal et Somalie. Ce portail propose des ressources pédagogiques pour soutenir la réponse d'un pays à la pandémie actuelle de COVID-19 et à d'autres menaces sanitaires. Créées en collaboration avec les bureaux pays de l'OMS et les ministères de la Santé, les ressources fondées sur les orientations scientifiques de l'OMS sont disponibles dans la ou les langues officielles de chaque pays afin de donner aux professionnels de santé de première ligne, aux décideurs et au public les moyens d'agir.

Cordialement,

L'équipe d'OpenWHO

Celebrating International Day of Sign Languages


23 September is International Day of Sign Languages! Our Indian sign language course on COVID-19 has more than 54 000 learners, with top enrolments from India, Bangladesh and Pakistan.

The course consists of 4 videos in Indian sign language, which provide an introduction to COVID-19 and show how to safely wear fabric and medical masks. It also includes a module customized for children with disabilities, with 2 text resources that cover the hygiene rules and precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

The Rehabilitation Council of India has included the course in the list of WHO modules recommended for rehabilitation professionals to upgrade their knowledge and skills during the pandemic. It has also been highlighted by national and international media.

Read more in our 'Stories from the field' feature here.

OpenWHO research paper on real-time pandemic learning response wins Best Education Paper Award


The Best Education Paper Award was given to the full research paper "Delivering WHO’s Life-Saving Information in Real-Time During a Pandemic Through an Online Learning Platform: Evidence from Global Use" by the 31st Medical Informatics Europe (MIE) 2021 conference on the topic of Public Health and Informatics.

A total of 261 papers were presented in the conference and 2 awards were granted. The “John Mantas” Best Education Paper awarded research paper was published under the thematic area of Human Factors and Citizen Centered Digital Health and can here found here.

The full MIE 2021 Conference Proceedings are available here.

[Webinar invitation] #LearningSavesLives Webinar Series - Protecting communities from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (SEA): are we doing enough?


Exploring challenges and opportunities for inter-agencies work to prevent SEA

Date: Wednesday, 15th September 2021

Time: 13:00 - 14:30 Central European Time

Register now

Panelists:

  • Ms Domenica Costantini, PSEA specialist, United Nations Population Fund, UNFPA
  • Ms Wendy Cue,OCHA Senior Coordinator for Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA) and Sexual Harassment, Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Secretariat, United Nations Geneva
  • Dr Ibrahima Socé Fall, Assistant Director-General, Emergency Response, WHO
  • Ms Mariska De Keersmaecker, Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA) Officer International Organization for Migration, IOM

WHO has a zero-tolerance policy towards all forms of Sexual Exploitation, Abuse and Harassment (SEAH) and is committed to capacitating our workforce, partners and collaborators to prevent, protect from and respond effectively and quickly to any allegation of SEAH. Joining force across agencies to fight SEAH can power our efforts and positively impact communities, victims and survivors directly. For the rest of 2021, WHO, together with our partners and experts across the world, we will run a learning series #StopSEAH under hosted by our #LearningSavesLives movement. This and other webinars in the series offer a unique platform for social exchange and learning from each other. This first webinar in the series will focus on the progress and challenges that humanitarian and emergency response agencies face in combatting SEAH. It will look at what exists, the achievements to date and the barriers that still persist.

Moderator: Dr Gaya Gamhewage, Director a.i., Prevention & Response to Sexual Exploitation, Abuse and Harassment (PRSEAH), WHO

In this webinar series, you will:

  • Discuss main challenges faced by PSEA experts in countries
  • Share experiences including best practices and lessons learned from PSEA experts and other institutions
  • Define WHO’s contributions to countries inter agency network
  • Discuss WHO’s reporting mechanism is described and know by experts and interventions to enhance reporting of SEA
  • Share experiences in reinforcing community engagement

#OpenWHO #LearningSavesLives #StopSEAH

OpenWHO multilingualism effort recognized in UN multilingualism audit report


Since the Learning and Capacity Development Unit of the WHO Health Emergencies Programme was formed in October 2018, following what constituted the WHO Ebola Training Team of 2014–2015, multilingualism has been brought to the core of emergency learning. This was recognized in the 2020 United Nations Multilingualism in the United Nations system Joint Inspection Unit report.

According to the report, “WHO is well prepared and operational in producing materials for emergencies based on lessons learned and findings made during the Ebola West Africa outbreak, which have been progressively turned into practices. The new solutions and services put into practice, which relate mainly to capacity-building among staff and knowledge transfer, include: (a) local language translation capacity; (b) unlimited online dissemination to the frontline through a dedicated low-bandwidth platform; and (c) a process to turn evidence-based and emergency guidelines into knowledge resources for responders.

“As also recently experienced with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, disease transmission chains cannot be stopped unless people understand how to keep themselves and their families safe. This means communicating in the right languages and formats for the widest possible audience at each location. These findings highlight the need for better information on the comprehension levels and communication preferences of people across affected and at-risk areas.”

Suriname nursing school embraces online learning during COVID-19 pandemic


The Elsje Finck-Sanichar College COVAB in Suriname specializes in the education of nurses and caretakers. COVAB and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)/ World Health Organization (WHO) have cultivated a longstanding relationship, and PAHO has facilitated the improved access for students and staff to the online educational platform OpenWHO. During the pandemic, five key courses related to COVID-19 were translated and offered in Dutch, making the material even more accessible for the local college.

PAHO spoke with Winamba Bamoeje, Education Manager at COVAB and Farzana Mohamed, who recently graduated from COVAB as a nurse practitioner, about the use of the OpenWHO courses during the pandemic.

How has education at COVAB changed since the pandemic hit Suriname?

“When the first COVID-19 case was confirmed in March 2020, COVAB removed all its students from healthcare institutions to assess the situation and generate next steps”, Mrs. Bamoeje tells us. A 3-week holiday was announced for the students and during that time, our management team and Director worked towards a solution to continue all educational tracks at COVAB so the students would not get behind on their studies. The college decided to implement distance-learning and on April 14th, 2020, we started offering classes online using Microsoft Teams. All planned exams, were taken online, including the final presentation by the students. Farzana (Mohamad) was in one of the first batches of students that completed their educational track with COVAB online.

“We as students were very happy with this quick response and sustainable solution by COVAB, and didn’t experience any delay”, added Ms. Mohamed.

“Because of distance-learning, I along with many other students found that this also created opportunities for us to work in addition to studying, which was a bit more difficult before, with the face-to-face classes.”

How has the organization adapted to distance-learning and what are the constraints in terms of distance-learning?

“Converting an institution that has always operated in-person to digital teaching methods is always difficult – the right software and enough hardware (computers) being of the utmost importance. Therefore, we were incredibly grateful that PAHO donated equipment for distance-learning such as laptops and cameras to our institution. When the OpenWHO courses for healthcare staff launched in English, we implemented an active participation policy for these courses, making them mandatory for our students. The language barrier was deemed a challenge in many instances however for both students and staff."

"After the courses had been translated and offered in Dutch by PAHO/WHO however, the participation rate went up and we received many positive responses from both staff and students alike”, explained Mrs. Bamoeje.

We implemented the use of Microsoft Teams throughout our organizations and offered “learning packages” to our students consisting of (handouts of) PowerPoint presentations, materials, and class planning. The Dean would regularly check up on the students, and if they informed us that they did not have access to internet we arranged an allowance of 50 SRD per day to activate internet on their phones or invited them to use COVAB’s Wi-Fi on site.

Getting our staff, as well as freelance educators, proper training to teach online, came with certain challenges. Digital literacy proved to be an issue in some instances, and with more than 300 teachers, providing the training, to work with distance-learning tools was quite challenging at times.

“Some students found it difficult to study in their own time, because holding oneself accountable and responsible is not everyone’s strong suit”, Ms. Mohamed elaborated, “But I do think it also helps to develop these skills, so it’s certainly not a negative development in my opinion. The OpenWHO courses are also very easily accessed through a mobile application, making them very user-friendly. Time management during this hectic period, was also crucial and what helped a lot is that the OpenWHO courses can be finished in parts. So, if I had to work one day and would only be able to complete 2 hours of a 4-hour course, I could finish the last 2 hours another day.”

How have the translated OpenWHO courses from English to Dutch impacted your organization? Is there a certain success story you would like to share?

“Language was definitely a barrier at first and we found that most people did not want to or were not able to participate in the courses in English. This changed after the courses got translated”, said Mrs. Bamoeje. As participation went up, and the courses could be finished by the students independently, the teachers had more time to prepare on other segments of education. The students simply had to provide their certificates of the completed mandatory courses.

“For me, the certificates I obtained through the OpenWHO COVID-19 response courses on topics such as PPE, COVID-19 patient care, and vaccination training helped me not only expand on essential knowledge and training during the pandemic, but also helped me and other students get temporary jobs at the vaccination sites. As a recent graduate, the Director of a hospital where I got hired as a nurse practitioner, also specifically applauded these additional courses on my CV and I’m sure other graduates will also experience, or have also had similar experiences when applying for jobs”, added Ms. Mohamed. “Because the OpenWHO courses not only cover how to administer the vaccinations, but also broader knowledge such as storage, proper handling etc., I noticed that at the vaccination sites, I was entrusted with more responsibility than those that had not followed these courses. The OpenWHO courses are very thorough.”

Looking back at a little over a year of COVID-19 in Suriname, how has PAHO contributed to helping your organization better manage this health emergency?

“PAHO has significantly contributed towards the improvement of our education through the continuous support of distance-learning, by providing material and courses. We’ve talked about the OpenWHO courses but let me add to that. On June 14th, our specialized education track started, and our students that live in District Nickerie, who previously had to travel all the way to Paramaribo to participate in the courses, have now been able to follow the courses at the COVAB facility in Nickerie, with laptops and material provided by PAHO. Students, both in Paramaribo and Nickerie are also able to borrow these laptops for studying or completing assignments at home.

In addition, the OpenWHO courses are not only beneficial for COVAB, but for healthcare in general in Suriname. We share the courses with our colleagues from other healthcare institutions, with our alumni, with our freelance and part-time teachers, to further help spread the essential knowledge to better respond to the COVID-19 crisis”, Mrs. Bamoeje elaborated.

PAHO/WHO launched the OpenWHO landing page for Suriname in May 2021, making the courses in Dutch even more accessible to local healthcare students and professionals.

This story was originally published in the PAHO/WHO website and is available here.

Promoting health literacy and reaching underserved demographics in the fight against COVID-19


The pandemic affects everyone – that’s why WHO is working to enhance health literacy as part of the global effort to fight COVID-19 by providing free online courses on OpenWHO.org.

OpenWHO learners come from all parts of the world and all sectors, from education, to transportation, to the entertainment industry. 28% of OpenWHO learners are health professionals, who need new knowledge during the pandemic to work safely and effectively.

OpenWHO is also reaching underserved demographics with real-time knowledge during the pandemic. Women represent 51% of OpenWHO learners, compared to 40% prior to the pandemic. 5% of OpenWHO learners are 70 years of age or older – a previously unrepresented demographic – as those vulnerable to COVID-19 actively seek life-saving information. The proportion of learners under age 20 has grown from 1% before the pandemic to 10% today.

In addition, OpenWHO course completion rates have increased from 39% before the pandemic to an average of 54% during the pandemic.

As of August 2021, OpenWHO.org hosts 5.6 million total enrolments across more than 100 different courses on 17 learning channels, including 37 courses for COVID-19. The platform offers courses in 55 languages and has awarded 2.9 million certificates.

Nearly 3000 trained in WHO, UNDRR and UNOSSC joint training on building back better post COVID-19


Geneva, Switzerland / New York, USA / Incheon, Korea

According to UN data, today 55% of the world’s population lives in urban areas, a proportion that is expected to increase to 68% by 2050. COVID-19 is ravaging the world, challenging cities and their citizens, with significant impacts on the social and health infrastructure and the economy. There is still a long road ahead before the pandemic is over. Towards creating more resilient and equitable societies post COVID-19, the training “Build back better: Harnessing South-South cooperation and disaster risk reduction planning for resilient and healthy cities in the post COVID-19 era” was organized from 8 to 29 June 2021.

This 4-week workshop was jointly organized by the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR) Global Education and Training Institute (GETI), the United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation (UNOSSC) under the framework of its Cities Project, and the World Health Organization (WHO) through its OpenWHO.org team. The training builds on the 3 agencies’ missions to improve urban disaster risk reduction (DRR) and resilience and health equity through harnessing South-South and triangular cooperation (SSTC) and disaster risk reduction planning.

Four live webinar sessions took place every Tuesday in June 2021. The first session on 8 June focused on an introduction to the conceptual frameworks of DRR planning, health emergency response preparedness and SSTC. The second session, led by UNDRR on 15 June, focused on the utilization of the Public Health System Resilience Addendum (PHA) of the Disaster Resilience Scorecard for Cities towards strengthening the integration of public health issues in DRR and resilience planning, highlighting also the example of Makati City, Philippines. The third session, led by WHO on 22 June, took a deep dive into the issues that impact the way cities and local governments prepare for and respond to health emergencies and other risks.

The final session on 29 June focused on sharing frontline experiences and practical measures used by national and local authorities in reopening safely and adjusting public health emergency response and DRR planning in response to the recent resurgences. Health authorities and experts from the Government of Bangladesh Cabinet Division, Santiago Metropolitan Region of Chile, China Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), City of Milan – Italy, Fujian Provincial CDC – China, and Ministry of Health and Wellness of Mauritius joined and exchanged with the participants.

Sanjaya Bhatia, Head of the Global Education and Training Institute, UNDRR, pointed out that the COVID-19 pandemic demonstrates that cities need to transit to a “new normal” and local authorities can use this as an opportunity to shape new and innovative policies that strengthen health systems, improve social protection, pursue climate-friendly solutions and continue the pathway towards resilience.

Overall, the training attracted more than 5000 registrations from 165 countries and territories, with close to 3000 participants joining each session from more than 1000 cities in 155 countries. Approximately 35% of the participants were from national and local governments, 24% from academic and research institutes, 12% from civil society organizations (CSOs), 12% from the private sector, and slightly more than 10% from the UN and international government organizations. Gender participation was almost equal.

At the end of the course, more than 2000 people responded to the online post-webinar survey. Among these respondents, 98% reported having gained knowledge on public health, health emergency response tools, SSTC and DRR that would be applicable to their work, and close to 90% would like to be part of the “South-South Cities Clusters” platform and collaborate with UNDRR, UNOSSC and WHO on future activities. More than 1400 participants completed the final assessments, passed the quiz and obtained a certificate of completion.

Links:

For more information, contact:

Nouveaux cours et nouvelles langues sur OpenWHO ce mois-ci


Newsletter mensuelle

Vous pouvez accéder à la newsletter la plus récente ici. Veuillez noter qu’actuellement, la newsletter n’est disponible qu’en anglais, mais que ses éléments clés sont disponibles en chinois, français, portugais, russe et espagnol.

De nouveaux cours et de nouvelles traductions pour la COVID-19

Nouveaux cours lancés

Nous sommes heureux de vous annoncer les cours suivants sur la COVID-19 :

Nouveaux cours sur d’autres sujets:

  • Modes opératoires normalisés de l’OMS pour les situations d’urgence: L'objectif de ce cours est de fournir des informations de haut niveau et une compréhension contextuelle des modes opératoires normalisés (SOP) de l'OMS pour les urgences. Le cours est disponible en anglais et en français et est conçu pour le personnel qui sera affecté par l'OMS à un déploiement en réponse à des urgences sanitaires.

  • Reconnaître et gérer l'anaphylaxie : Ce cours donne des indications sur la manière de reconnaître et de différencier l'anaphylaxie et la réaction liée au stress de l'immunisation et de répondre à l'anaphylaxie en tant qu'événement indésirable après une immunisation.

  • Kit de formation sur les maladies tropicales négligées: Les maladies tropicales négligées (MTN) sont un groupe de maladies qui affectent principalement les populations défavorisées des pays tropicaux et subtropicaux. Dans le but de protéger les communautés et de responsabiliser les travailleurs de la santé dans le monde entier, OpenWHO a lancé des ressources de formation dédiées à certaines de ces maladies - la tungose, la podoconiose et la gale - et d'autres cours sont en cours de développement.

  • Formation à l'approche One Health (« une seule santé ») : Deux nouveaux cours sont disponibles sur la chaîne One Health d'OpenWHO. Ces formations explorent les principes et les meilleures pratiques pour renforcer l'approche One Health (« Une seule santé ») pour les zoonoses au niveau national et sous-national : Naviguer dans le guide tripartite pour la gestion des zoonoses (TZG) : Une formation pour les défenseurs et les responsables de la mise en œuvre et Évaluation conjointe des risques (outil opérationnel pour l’ECR) : Une formation pour les responsables de la mise en œuvre.

Nouvelles traductions

Les 6 traductions suivantes sur la COVID-19 ont été lancées ce mois-ci :

  • Prise en charge clinique : Réadaptation des patients atteints de la COVID-19 en russe
  • Prise en charge clinique : Approche initiale en somali
  • Prise en charge clinique : Considérations générales en indonésien
  • Santé et sécurité au travail en néerlandais
  • Maladies tropicales négligées dans le contexte de la COVID-19 en portugais et en arabe

Mis à jour du contenu du cours

Une nouvelle vidéo a été ajoutée au portail Discussions scientifiques et stratégiques sur la COVID-19. Dans cette nouvelle vidéo, Dr Maria Van Kerkhove donne un aperçu de la situation épidémiologique de la pandémie de COVID-19 et expose les grandes lignes de la réponse mondiale et de la démarche à suivre.

Nous avons le plaisir d’annoncer que la plateforme OpenWHO comporte désormais 37 cours sur la COVID-19, répartis en 52 langues. Tous les cours sur la COVID-19 peuvent être consultés ici. Vous pouvez utiliser la barre d’outils pour filtrer les cours par langue. Vous pouvez aussi accéder à nos catalogues qui listent tous les cours et toutes les langues disponibles pour la COVID-19 et les autres sujets de santé ici.

Nouvelle chaîne de résistance aux antimicrobiens (RAM)

Cette nouvelle chaîne offre des ressources d’apprentissage pour soutenir la mise en œuvre du Plan d’action mondial sur la RAM (2015), en renforçant les compétences des professionnels de la santé pour les aider à combattre la résistance aux antimicrobiens dans leur pratique clinique quotidienne. Actuellement, la page héberge deux cours qui sont disponibles en plusieurs langues de l’ONU et en plusieurs langues nationales : Bon usage des antibiotiques: Une approche basée sur les compétences et Tuberculose résistante aux médicaments : comment interpréter les résultats des tests moléculaires rapides.

Nouvelle page Témoignages du terrain

La page « Témoignages du terrain » souligne comment les ressources d'apprentissage de l'OpenWHO sont déployées dans les pays pour soutenir la réponse à la pandémie de COVID-19 et à d'autres menaces sanitaires. Pour lire ces histoires inspirantes, veuillez accéder à la page sous la rubrique « En savoir plus » dans le menu supérieur ou cliquez ici.

Webinaires #LearningSavesLives

Vous pouvez maintenant revoir les webinaires #LearningSavesLives précédents ici. Depuis février, l'équipe chargée de l'apprentissage et du développement des capacités, qui travaille en étroite collaboration avec d’autres équipes du programme des urgences sanitaires de l’OMS, a organisé 8 webinaires #LearningSavesLives dans différentes langues (en anglais, en espagnol, en français et en portugais). Apprenez auprès de notre panel d'experts sur une variété de sujets et restez à l'écoute pour les prochaines sessions !

Bien cordialement,

L’équipe OpenWHO

Exploring the use of WHO’s COVID-19 vaccination online learning in countries


The Access to COVID-19 Tools (ACT) Accelerator’s Country Readiness and Delivery workstream developed an OpenWHO training course for national and sub-national stakeholders on key aspects of COVID-19 vaccine deployment. The initial courses launched in December 2020 and were complemented by vaccine product-specific trainings in March 2021. As of June 2021, the Orientation to National Deployment and Vaccination Planning for COVID-19 Vaccines (NDVP) course had more than 15 000 learners in English alone and is available in over 13 languages.

A learner feedback survey was conducted from March to April 2021 to understand the impact of the trainings, usability for learners, and potential value of online training expansion for other immunizations. Using the survey responses and data available from the OpenWHO platform, WHO assessed the knowledge gained from participating in the course. The increase of knowledge from the course was assessed using the average score change between the pre-test and the post-test.

The scores increased by an average of 44% for the NDVP course from an average pre-test score of 51.5% to an average post-test score of 95.5%. Additionally, a substantially higher rate of the enrolled learners completed the course than the industry benchmark for a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC).

The user feedback provides insight for WHO learning providers in health emergencies. Over 96% of the survey participants agreed that they have more confidence in performing their professional roles related to COVID-19 vaccination after taking the course. More than 60% of learners in the survey indicated that they prefer online learning over other training options. However, 44% of survey participants had at least one barrier to online learning (such as internet connection, IT related issues, not enough time to complete the course, language barriers, etc.). Despite these limitations, learners, all levels of WHO and partners have expressed strong interest in further expansion of the OpenWHO online learning courses

Webinars create global dialogue between health emergency experts, field practitioners and learners on how to tackle COVID-19


The old proverb states that necessity is the mother of invention. While webinars are not a particularly new invention, for OpenWHO.org their use marks the beginning of a new, powerful platform for engaging and expanding its user base in the health emergency preparedness and response arena.

Since February, participation in webinars has been substantial: nearly 20 000 participants have attended a total of 12 webinars produced with OpenWHO collaboration. If we were to equate our reach in terms of filling a stadium, it would compare to filling two-thirds of the Stade de Genève, Lancy (capacity 30 000) with participants.

As we all know, the ongoing pandemic has been marked by the rapid emergence of massive amounts of new knowledge on how to respond. This new knowledge is often presented in isolation, with little context or space for analysis and reflection, and countered by misinformation and disinformation. The flood of information is overwhelming, and the noise that comes with it distracts from what is free and available. Helping address this is at the heart of the new webinar series.

In practical terms, late last year, the Learning and Capacity Development team, working in close coordination with other WHO Health Emergencies Programme teams, realized that there was an opportunity and a clear need to empower the millions who were already taking advantage of OpenWHO.org COVID-19 course offerings, bring context and grow our shared learner base. With this in mind, the #LearningSavesLives webinar series was born.

As Heini Utunen, who manages the OpenWHO platform, explains: "We wanted to help our users connect the dots, to help transform the available information into applicable, powerful knowledge... to help them realize how they could better capitalize on the growing universe of COVID-19 courses being offered in multiple languages... to bring opportunities to maximize that knowledge by hearing the experiences of those working in the field and WHO experts."

As the pandemic continues, webinars have endured as a popular interactive tool to transfer life-saving knowledge to all corners of the globe. Grounded on OpenWHO.org principles of equity, free access and lifelong learning, these webinars provide a unique opportunity for anyone with an internet connection to interact directly with experts and those in the field.

Since February, we have held 8 #LearningSavesLives webinars in multiple languages (English, Spanish, French and Portuguese). In June, a second limited-duration multilingual webinar series was launched in English, Spanish, Chinese, Portuguese, French and Arabic. This forward-looking joint online training is titled, "Build back better: Harnessing South-South cooperation and risk reduction planning for resilient and healthy cities in the post COVID-19 era" and was co-organized with the UN Office for South-South Cooperation (UNOSSC) and the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR) Global Education and Training Institute (GETI).

While the summer season in the northern hemisphere will be quieter in terms of the number of webinars, the autumn will see more taking place. We invite you to stay tuned, present us with ideas, partner with us and help us share information about future sessions so more people can benefit from the product of our shared collaboration.

Together we can help end this pandemic and begin to set the path to build back better a post-pandemic world.

World Zoonosis Day 6 July: Online learning supports governments to operationalize a One Health approach in countries


'One Health' is an approach in which multiple sectors communicate and work together to achieve better public health outcomes. One area of work in which a One Health approach is particularly relevant includes the control of zoonoses (diseases that can spread between animals and humans, such as avian flu, rabies and Rift Valley Fever) where efforts by just one sector cannot prevent or eliminate the problem. A One Health approach is key to the management of shared threats for future outbreaks and pandemics at the human-animal-environment interface.

Three new courses are available on the OpenWHO One Health Channel, allowing learners from around the globe to explore principles and best practices for a One Health approach for zoonotic diseases. The first course introduces the critical role of international frameworks to help human and animal health sectors ‘bridge’ their work to meet shared goals for disease preparedness and response. Once learners understand the role of collaborative work in their country context, they can then explore the practical approaches set forth in the Tripartite Zoonoses Guide and its operational tools. The second course offering on the One Health channel allows learners to explore and navigate the technical chapters of the Tripartite Zoonoses Guide in more depth, using country examples to propel their learning to the next level. And finally, a training for implementers is available for those interested in using the Joint Risk Assessment operational tool to asses and manage zoonotic diseases hazards at national and subnational levels.

Join us today and begin exploring the principles and best practices for a One Health approach in countries!

Nouveaux cours et nouvelles langues sur OpenWHO ce mois-ci


Newsletter mensuelle

Vous pouvez accéder à la newsletter la plus récente ici. Veuillez noter qu’actuellement, la newsletter n’est disponible qu’en anglais, mais que ses éléments clés sont disponibles en chinois, français, portugais, russe et espagnol.

Ready4Response Niveau 1 and 2 : Disponible maintenant pour les travailleurs de première ligne

Ce module de formation vise à développer des normes d'apprentissage harmonieuses pour l'ensemble du personnel d'intervention d'urgence, en dotant les participants des compétences essentielles nécessaires pour travailler à différents niveaux d'intervention.

Nous vous invitons à vous inscrire aux cours de ce package de formation:

#LearningSavesLives Webinar Series

Interconnectés: Maladies de l'homme et de l’animal et leur impact sur la vie et les moyens de subsistance

Lors de la Journée mondiale des zoonoses 2021, le 6 juillet à 14h00 (CET), rejoignez notre panel mondial d'experts et de praticiens pour discuter de l'impact des maladies zoonotiques sur nos vies, notre santé et nos moyens de subsistance et discuter de la manière dont nous pouvons renforcer les capacités et les systèmes pour lutter contre les conséquences des maladies zoonotiques.

Vous pouvez vous inscrire à ce webinaire ici.

De nouveaux cours et de nouvelles traductions pour la COVID-19

Célébration de 100 sujets de cours

Nous sommes heureux d'annoncer le 100ème sujet de cours d'OpenWHO. Le cours est axé sur les stratégies de gestion des soins aux patients atteints de COVID-19 léger, modéré et sévère.

Nouvelles traductions

Les 13 traductions suivantes pour la COVID-19 ont été lancées ce mois-ci :

  • ePROTECT Infections Respiratoires en kazakh

  • Prévention et Contrôle des Infections (PCI) pour le virus de la COVID-19 en kazakh

  • Formation du personnel de santé à la vaccination contre la COVID-19 en kazakh

  • Leadership et gestion de programme en prévention et contrôle des infections en albanais et en azéri

  • Virus respiratoires émergents, y compris le COVID-19 : méthodes de détection, de prévention, de réponse et de contrôle en kazakh

  • Maladies tropicales négligées dans le contexte de la pandémie COVID-19 : impact et conseils en espagnol et en français

  • Santé et paix en arabe

  • Formation de l’OMS sur la prise en charge clinique des infections Respiratoires Aiguës Sévères (SARI) en kazakh

  • Lignes directrices de planification opérationnelle concernant la COVID-19 et Plateforme des Partenaires pour accompagner la préparation et la riposte des pays face à la COVID-19 en kazakh

  • Gestion clinique des patients atteints de COVID-19 - Réhabilitation des patients atteints de la COVID-19 en chinois

  • Comment enfiler et retirer l’Équipement de Protection Individuelle (EPI) pour la COVID-19 en kazakh

Nous avons le plaisir d’annoncer qu’OpenWHO dispose désormais de 35 cours au sujet de la COVID-19 traduits dans 52 langues. Tous les cours relatifs à la COVID-19 sont accessibles ici. Vous pouvez utiliser la barre d’outils pour filtrer les cours par langue. Vous pouvez également accéder à notre catalogue qui présente tous les cours et toutes les langues disponibles au sujet de la COVID-19 ainsi qu’à d’autres sujets liés à la santé ici.

Nouvelle chaîne « soutien aux pays » sur OpenWHO

La chaîne « soutien aux pays » propose des ressources d'apprentissage pour soutenir la réponse d'un pays à la pandémie de COVID-19 en cours et à d'autres menaces pour la santé. Créées en collaboration avec les bureaux de pays de l'OMS et les ministères de la Santé, des ressources basées sur les orientations scientifiques de l'OMS sont disponibles dans la ou les langues officielles de chaque pays pour donner les outils nécessaires aux agents de santé de première ligne, les décideurs et le public. Jusqu'à présent, les pages pays suivantes sont disponibles: Inde, Kazakhstan, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Timor-Leste, Ukraine et Viet Nam.

Nouvelles chaînes sur OpenWHO

Chaîne «vaccins COVID-19»

La nouvelle chaîne des vaccins COVID-19 fournit aux agents de santé, aux points focaux nationaux et infranationaux et aux partenaires les informations nécessaires pour assurer une livraison sûre et efficace du vaccin contre la COVID-19. Les cours suivants sont actuellement disponibles sous cette chaîne: ressources spécifiques au vaccin contre la COVID-19; Orientation vers le déploiement national et la planification de la vaccination pour les vaccins contre la COVID-19, et Formation à la vaccination COVID-19 pour les agents de santé.

Chaîne Go.Data

Cette chaîne contient des ressources permettant d'apprendre à utiliser le logiciel Go.Data pour le suivi des contacts et la collecte de données dans le cadre de la réponse aux épidémies. La chaîne propose des cours de formation en ligne en plusieurs langues et de courts tutoriels vidéo qui montrent comment utiliser les principales fonctionnalités du logiciel Go.Data.

Discussions scientifiques et stratégiques sur la COVID-19

Cette page héberge des enregistrements vidéo de présentations données par des experts de l'OMS dans divers domaines lors de conférences et d'autres forums, afin que ces connaissances essentielles puissent continuer à être partagées à travers le monde.

Cordialement,

OpenWHO team

[Webinar invitation] #LearningSavesLives Webinar Series - Intertwined - diseases of man and beast and their impact on lives and livelihoods


Celebrating World Zoonoses Day 2021

Date: Tuesday, 6th July 2021

Time: 14:00 - 15:30 Central European Time

Register now

Panelists:

  • Dr Bernadette Abela-RIDDER, Scientist, Department of the Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases, WHO HQ
  • Dr Wesinew Adugna, Livestock Program Manager, VSF-Suisse, Ethiopia
  • Dr Barbara Alessandrini, Head of the Capacity Building Department, OIE, France
  • Ms. Edwinah Atusingwize, Research Associate, Department of Disease Control and Environmental Health, Makerere University, Uganda
  • Dr Nitish Debnath, Team Leader, Fleming Fund Project, Bangladesh
  • Prof. Oladele Ogunseitan, Leader of Training and Empowerment, USAID One Health Workforce|Next Generation Project, University of California, Irvine, US
  • Dr Stéphane de la Rocque, Team Leader, Human Animal Interface, Health Security preparedness Department, WHO HQ
  • Dr Nigel Swift, Global Head of Veterinary Public Health, Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health, France
  • Prof Andrea Winkler, Co-Director of Centre for Global Health Technical University of Munich, Germany

Did you know the majority of infectious diseases in people are of animal origin? We call these zoonotic diseases. Seven out of ten new disease discovered the last decade – including the virus that is responsible for the COVID19 pandemic, are caused by pathogens which jumped from animals to humans. The truth is that our lives and health are closely intertwined with animals and the environment in which we all live. On World Zoonosis Day 2021, join our global panel of experts and practitioners to discuss the impact zoonotic diseases have on our lives, health, and livelihoods and discuss how we can build the capacity and systems to address the impact of zoonotic diseases.

Moderator: Dr Gaya Gamhewage, Head of Learning & Capacity Development, Health Emergencies Programme, WHO

Zoonosis related courses on OpenWHO👇

#OpenWHO #LearningSavesLives #HealthForAll #BuildingsustainablesystemforOneHealth